In the News

Copyright 2020
The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020. In addition to giving people access to health care treatments, the new law will provide roughly $2 trillion in much-needed financial relief to individuals, businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and state and local governments during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Here are some of the key financial relief provisions.
Copyright 2020
Good old-fashioned paper is continuing to return to the manufacturing process.
Copyright 2020
Builder's risk insurance provides protection for a structure that is damaged during construction. These policies are usually broad. In fact, the coverage is generally extensive enough to include construction equipment and machinery, as well as materials, fixtures, and appliances -- all vital parts of a completed structure. It can also cover temporary structures, such as office trailers, on a project site.
Copyright 2020
Frustrated by rising costs, managed care demands and overwhelming patient loads, a growing number of physicians are converting their traditional practices into retainer-based or "concierge" practices. Under this evolving model, physicians cut back the number of patients they see, spend more time on personalized care and charge each participant an annual fee ranging from $1,500 to $20,000. In short, these doctors receive more money for seeing fewer patients and gain more control over the way they practice medicine.
Copyright 2020
The IRS has publicly stated it is cracking down on organizations that improperly classify workers as independent contractors instead of employees. Are you confident that your employee classifications would stand up to IRS scrutiny?
Copyright 2020
Here's a little-known secret for parents planning to send their children to college in the future: Some of the tax-saving moves you make now could hurt your student's chances for getting financial aid later.
Copyright 2020
The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has had a crippling effect on the global economy. This is clearly uncharted territory. As millions around the globe do their best to minimize their exposure to the virus, business owners and managers face an uncertain and stressful future.
Copyright 2020
The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has already had widespread effects on the U.S. economy. Demand for many goods and services has stalled. Unemployment claims have skyrocketed. And many schools and businesses are operating online — if at all. Life has changed dramatically across the country.
Copyright 2020
If money were no object, you could keep your plant and warehouse so cool that productivity sizzles during hot weather -- rather than employees. But there may be a cheaper option for your company than simply using air conditioning: roof mist cooling.
Copyright 2020
As you may know, contractors have multiple accounting methods to choose from. But some are off-limits to certain contractors. As your construction company endures the ups and downs of a bumpy industry, it's worth your while to review your options

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