In the News

Copyright 2018
In an era filled with uncertainty, you can count on one thing: time marches on. Here are some important age-related financial and tax milestones to keep in mind for you and your loved ones:
Copyright 2018
The scope of employment discrimination banned by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is sweeping. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) which enforces the ADA, the law covers "any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoffs, training, fringe benefits or any other term of condition of employment." Two cases illustrate some key pitfalls that employers need to consider to avoid actual or apparent discrimination.
Copyright 2018
Estate planning is an important part of your overall wealth management strategy, especially if you're unmarried. Single parents may worry about who will care for their minor children and whether their surviving kids' financial needs will be met until adulthood. Likewise, wealthy single people have less flexibility when it comes to shielding transfers from gift and estate taxes.
Copyright 2018
The IRS uses "Collection Financial Standards" to help determine a taxpayer's ability to pay a delinquent tax liability. Allowable living expenses include those that meet the test of being necessary to provide for a taxpayer's (and his or her family's) health and welfare, as well as his or her ability to produce income.
Copyright 2018
Every year, the IRS releases cost-of-living adjustments to qualified retirement plan amounts. For tax year 2019, many of the limits applicable to pensions and other retirement plans will increase. But some will remain unchanged from 2018.
Copyright 2018
The countdown to year end has begun. Have you positioned yourself to minimize your 2018 tax bill? The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) made sweeping changes to the federal tax laws that will affect virtually all individual taxpayers — and most of those changes went into effect for this tax year. Here are four tried-and-true tax planning strategies, tweaked to account for the TCJA.
Copyright 2018
The countdown to year end has begun. Have you positioned yourself to minimize your 2018 tax bill? The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) made sweeping changes to the federal tax laws that will affect virtually all individual taxpayers — and most of those changes went into effect for this tax year. Here are four tried-and-true tax planning strategies, tweaked to account for the TCJA.
Copyright 2018
Get the most from Social Security. Younger retirees face a harsh penalty for working part-time. For every $2 earned over $17,640 in 2019 (up from $17,040 in 2018), you lose $1 in Social Security benefits. In the year you reach full retirement age, a higher earnings threshold applies. Your benefits will be reduced by $1 for every $3 of earnings only when earnings exceed $46,920 in 2019 if you reach full retirement age (up from $45,360 for 2018).
Copyright 2018
Taking steps to defer your individual federal income tax bill is often a good idea. If you expect to be in the same tax bracket in future years, lowering this year's taxable income will postpone your tax bill and give you extra cash to work with until the bill comes due. If your tax rates turn out to be lower in future years, deferring taxable income into those future years will cause the deferred amounts to be taxed at lower rates.
Copyright 2018
The holiday season is fast approaching. It's the time when people traditionally make gifts to charities. Generally, year-end donations increase the charitable deduction you can claim on the personal tax return you'll file the next year. But 2018 is different from most previous tax years.

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